Kollies Genealogy

Wordless Wednesday: Eleanor Cooke (GG Grandmother)

Wordless Wednesday: Eleanor Cooke (GG Grandmother)

Wordless Wednesday: Medal (back)

Wordless Wednesday: Medal (back)

Wordless Wednesday: Medal (front)

Wordless Wednesday: Medal (front)

Research: The Liverpool Library

Yesterday I lost my cherry in terms of Microfile research in a records archive, I went with my parents (who very kindly offered to come and help me) to the Liverpool Library, in particular the records of local history section.  I didn’t know what to expect before I got there, of course I’d seen the record offices on WDYTYA and Heir Hunters but still couln’t imagine me doing that sort of thing.

Before I left home I made sure I had the tools I thought I’d need:

  • Relevant records I already had
  • A list of what records I wanted to search
  • A notepad
  • A pencil
  • Seperate eraser
  • Camera
  • Phone
  • Money

I had decided that if I just went there and thought I’ll have a look in the burial records (the purpose of my visit was to locate the graves of my ancestors) I would get lost pretty quickly and not end up with very much information, probably making the experience uncomfortable, and causing me to be reluctant to visit again anytime soon.  So, I made a list of things I wanted to do, I used a website called www.workflowy.com a new website I’d found that fitted my needs (more on this site in another post).  With my list consisting of:

  • Name
  • Birth
  • Death
  • Obituary
  • Cemetery
  • Plot & Grave number

Any of the information I already knew I had filled in to give me quick pointers to what I should research.

When I got to the library I explained to the man that I had previously emailed in, and was advised no appointment was necessary for using the Microfile machine, but that I had absolutely no idea how the system worked, etc.  He was very nice, showing me where the records where kept, how to use the index book to locate the relevant microfile, how to operate the Printer/Reader, and offering anymore assistance if required.

I had decided the easiest way for me to to find where my ancestors (mostly Great Grandparents) where buried, was first by looking through the obituary section of the local paper, The Liverpool Echo, for the days following their death.  My thinking being that most people use this section not only to post the death and their remembrance, but to update people as to where the service was going to be held and on what date. I had quite a bit of success with this, finding two ancestors details of service, and all my ancestors obituaries that I searched for.

Next, I looked through the index book for Allerton cemetery (both of the references I found where in this cemetery), picked up the relevant Microfilm, and searched through the pages until I found the entrance for my ancestor.  Brilliant!

I quickly finished off my research, packed everything away, paid for my printouts 19 in total, at 30p each, and headed off back to my car…Next stop, Allerton Cemetery!

What’s in a surname: Everitt

1st occurrence in my family history: 3rd Generation (Grandmother, Mona Rose [Everitt])

Spelling variations of this family name include: Everett, Everatt, Everet, and many more

This interesting and long-established surname is of early medieval English origin, and derives from the Old German male given name “Eburhard” or “Everhard”, a compound of the elements “eber”, wild boar, and “hard”, hardy, brave, strong. Introduced into England by the Normans after the Conquest of 1066, the name is particularly well recorded in East Anglia, an area of dense Norman and Breton settlement. “Ebrard” and “Eurardus” (without surname) appear in the Domesday Book of 1086 for Norfolk and Cambridgeshire.

The surname was first recorded at the beginning of the 13th Century. The step between Everard and the later forms, Everett and Everitt, is Everad, as in Geoffrey Everad noted in the “Chartulary of Ramsey Abbey”, Norfolk, dated 1300. Recordings of the surname from English Church Registers include: the marriage of Sarah Everett to Cornelius Fisher at Dilham, Norfolk, on July 25th 1565, and the marriage of Elizabeth Everitt to John Heyward at All Saints, Fulbourn, Cambridgeshire, on April 4th 1572. A notable bearer of the name was Allen Edward Everitt, secretary of the Royal Society of Artists of Birmingham, 1858 - 1882.

The Everitt Coat of Arms is a silver shield with a fesse between three red estoiles, the Crest being a demi lady holding in the dexter hand a balance and scales, equally poised proper. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Richard Everard, which was dated 1204, in the “Pipe Rolls of Bedfordshire”, during the reign of King John, known as “Lackland”, 1199 - 1216. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to “develop” often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

In the United Kingdom today there are 4024 people with the surname Everitt, this places it as the 1556th most common. For every 1million people 88 are called Everitt!

Sources:

http://www.houseofnames.com/everitt-family-crest

http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Everitt

http://www.britishsurnames.co.uk/surnames/EVERITT/


Wordless Wednesday: Percy Rose (grandfather), receives telegram

Wordless Wednesday: Percy Rose (grandfather), receives telegram

Genealogy podcasts have taken over my commute!

I would never have thought when I first searched my grandfathers name on the Internet the impact it would have on my life. as you’ve probably gathered by now I’m slightly addicted to genealogy, so much so that it’s become an integral part of my trip to and from work. I find that instead of listening to music, I get a much calmer and economical (important with petrol being over £1.30 nowadays) journey if I listen to a genealogy podcast.

Before this I had never really *got* podcasts, sure I’d listened to the odd one from Radio 1, or a random one I’d downloaded from iTunes. But I’d never really subscribed to anything before, that was until I found a couple of genealogy podcasts.

1. Geneabloggers Radio: this is a weekly web based radio show, hosted by Thomas Macentee every Friday night. The subjects vary from week to week, but the theme is always consistent. It’s a talk show, with 2-3 guests per week, some general genealogy hints and tips, recent genealogy news, and a very interactive chat board (although I’ve never seen this love due to the time difference, I’m led to believe it’s awesome, and have no reason to disagree). Although the radio show is broadcast at 3am GMT, it is available by the time I wake up on Saturday morning, and fits in nicely with my daily drive.

2. The National Archives: based around the National Archives in the UK, each podcast has a set theme or story, where the speaker (different each time) will discuss an area of their own expertise. The information is always excellent, however the recording quality can leave a lot to be desired. Still it gets a regular listen from me.

3. Geni: bitesize chunks of genealogy, normally with the guest Thomas Macentee. Every episode covers an area of research e.g. Collaborative genealogy, and always findings off with how the website www.geni.com incorporates this feature. Whilst it sounds like a 15 minute advert, it’s definitely not delivered that way, and is one of the best podcasts I listen to due to it being in snippet format.

4. Genealogy Gems: Hosted by Lisa Louise Cooke, a great podcast covering a multitude of genealogy areas. I look forward to the next release as soon as I’ve finished listening to the current one.
Do you have a favourite genealogy podcast? Give ne a shout on twitter to discuss further @kollies


Links:
1. Geneabloggers: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/geneabloggers
2. National Archives: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/podcasts/
3. Geni: http://www.geni.com/blog/podcast
4. Genealogy Gems: http://www.genealogygems.tv/Pages/Podcast/PodcastList.htm

Using census records

Whilst browsing the web looking for random geealogy hits and tips I stumbled across this little gem of a presentation on census records.

Using Census Records View more presentations from RodneyFox

What’s in a surname: Howey

1st occurrence in my family history: 3rd generation (grandmother, Constance Howey).

Spelling variations of this family name include: Howie, Howe, Howey, Howy and others.

In the United Kingdom today there are 608 people with the surname Howey, this makes it the 7711th most common. Therefore, for every 1million people 13 of them have the surname Howey!

Recorded as Howie and Howey, this famous Scottish name is locational. It derives from an estate known a “The lands of How” in the county of Ayrshire, although the precise location is now lost. The name therefore is a member of the ever growing list of surnames of the British Isles that originate from lost medieval sites. It is claimed that the origin is from the Ancient British-Strathclyde ‘hoh’, a word which pre-dates written history, and describes a hollow or deep valley, from which also developed the surname How or Howe. The name as Howie or Howey is probably a diminutive meaning Little How, the suffix ‘ie’ or ‘y’ being a popular Scottish and North of England endearment.

The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William Howye. This was dated 1526, when he was appointed Sergeant at Arms of the town of Brechin, during the reign of King James V of Scotland, 1513 -1542. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as Poll Tax.

Sources:

http://www.britishsurnames.co.uk/surnames/HOWEY/

http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Howie

Technology Thursday: Google+

If you haven’t already heard, Google has launched a new social network, it takes the best of all the other ones e.g. facebook, twitter, etc, and combiners them in to one.  in the first month it had over 10 million users, and that was even with it being an invite only Beta.

Its a great place to be, you can share certain things with specific people if you want by posting it to the relevant circle e.g. Genealogist, work buddies, family, [insert favourite sport] team, etc; or if you’re happy too, you can share things publicly for everyone to see.

Why not add me, we can chat about whatever you want

Haven’t ben invited yet, no problem click here —> https://plus.google.com/_/notifications/ngemlink?path=%2F%3Fgpinv%3DilYB9ifz4Co%3AQD9_HNQqiRE 

Already on there, add me http://gplus.to/Kollies

Time to get organised!

Working a full time job I find it difficult to research effectively all the time, I’ll listen to a genealogy podcast on my journey to and from work, constantly churning over new ideas about how to progress, technology to use, websites to visit, and much more.

However, by the time I’ve finished my day some of the ideas I earlier had I’ve forgotten, either in full or the important reason I wanted to research a particular area.

Another area where I struggle is due to the above I’ll start one area of research, but by the time I get around to researching again I’ll forget where I was up to, and lose the momentum I had the day(s) before.

So I need to break the mould, the question is how? I think I need a research log, I’ve heard about other more experienced genealogist’s using these, and how they’ve helped them keep everything in order. This would also appeal to my obsession with lists. Two birds, one stone.

How do you make time to do your research?

Feel free to send me a tweet to @kollies about your own family history research.

Wordless Wednesday: Ronald Hollingsworth (Grandparent)

Wordless Wednesday: Ronald Hollingsworth (Grandparent)

Tombstone Tuesday: the picture shows John Joseph Howey, his wife Gladys Howey (Great Grandparents), and Ronald Hollingsworth (Grandparent, and son-in-law of the above).

I took the photo on a recent trip to a Liverpool cemetery with my father, it was 19 years since we had both been to the grave, and probably would’ve been a few years longer if it wasn’t for a recent hobby of mine aka genealogy.

The day was moving, we both couldn’t exactly remember where the grave was, I could barely remember the cemetery.  However as we entered the gates it all came flooding back to the both of us.

R.I.P. to my Grandfather, and Great Grandparents. Call of whom I never met.

Tombstone Tuesday: the picture shows John Joseph Howey, his wife Gladys Howey (Great Grandparents), and Ronald Hollingsworth (Grandparent, and son-in-law of the above).

I took the photo on a recent trip to a Liverpool cemetery with my father, it was 19 years since we had both been to the grave, and probably would’ve been a few years longer if it wasn’t for a recent hobby of mine aka genealogy.

The day was moving, we both couldn’t exactly remember where the grave was, I could barely remember the cemetery. However as we entered the gates it all came flooding back to the both of us.

R.I.P. to my Grandfather, and Great Grandparents. Call of whom I never met.