Kollies Genealogy

Can you help me? Alderman H. E. Rose

My Great Grandfather was an Alderman in Liverpool in the first 1/2 of the 20th Century.  He received and honorary degree from the university of Liverpool in 1942, before passing away in 1943.  

I was wondering if anyone had any advice on how I can get hold of a copy of his work records relating to him being an Alderman? Or information relating to the  reason why he was given an honorary degree?

Here are his details:
Name: Herbert Edward Rose
Born: 24/08/1877
Place: Alnwick, Northumberland, England

Married: Florence Wright
Date: 23/06/1903
Place: Seacombe

Death: 19/10/1943
Place: Liverpool, England.

Here is a link to the forum I originally posted this question: http://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php/topic,566287.0.html

I knew I should have chosen to study Latin!

Whilst looking through parish records on ancestry recently I relaised that the language being used was not English, at first I thought it was French due to the name ‘John’ being written as ‘Joannes’, but then after looking at a few more records I realised words like ‘matrimonius’ where appearing. I never studied Latin in school (the school I went too never had the option of choosing it either), however my wife did. So I passed over my iPad to her to translate a passage I’d found…she was too rusty, and was unable (not unwilling) to help me.

So I turn to you, I need some help translating the below passage taken from the marriage records for my Great Grandparents.

Click here to see the pic I need translating -> http://t.co/olJfPd1S

If you can offer any assistance it would be greatly appreciated.Regards

——————————————————————————- Here is a reply I’ve had, seems to explain it: “It is a statement that there are no impediments of consanguinity that these people should not marry. This would read out on three consecutive Sundays at the church where they are to be married.”
Genealogy subscription…so much choice

As I mentioned on my other blog the other day was my birthday, and one thing I got was cash.  Now I wanted to subscribe to a genealogy subscription site, however cant choose one, so I was hoping for a little help?

Do I go for the obvious choice of Ancestry? Or do I go for a smaller site like The Genealogist, Genes Reunited,  or British Origins.

I you are subscribed to any of the sites or can recommend anygood alternatives I’d appreciate your thoughts.

Can you help me? Alderman H. E. ROSE

My Great Grandfather was an Alderman in Liverpool in the first 1/2 of the 20th Century.  He received and honorary degree from the university of Liverpool in 1942, before passing away in 1943.  

I was wondering if anyone had any advice on how I can get hold of a copy of his work records relating to him being an Alderman? Or information relating to the  reason why he was given an honorary degree?

Here are his details:
Name: Herbert Edward Rose
Born: 24/08/1877
Place: Alnwick, Northumberland, England

Married: Florence Wright
Date: 23/06/1903
Place: Seacombe

Death: 19/10/1943
Place: Liverpool, England.

Herbert E ROSE

Here is a link to the forum I originally posted this question: http://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php/topic,566287.0.html

Wordless Wednesday: Family portrait 2011

Wordless Wednesday: Family portrait 2011

What’s in a surname: Hughson

1st occurrence in my family history: 5th Generation (Great Great Grandmother, Sarah Hollingsworth [Hughson])

Spelling variations of this family name include: Hewison, Heweson, Howeson, Howeston, Howstoun, Huison and many more.

The first spelling was as the given name Hugo meaning “heart or mind”, and as such this spelling appears in the famous English Domesday Book of the year 1086. Perhaps not surprisingly given a meaning of heart or mind, the personal name was highly popular, and by the 12th century was to be found in almost every European country. The surname is recorded in the same period, (see below), the first of all the such hereditary surname recordings being found in England. This was the country which first adopted both surnames and register recordings as we know them today.

These early recordings include such examples as Richard Hue of the city of Worcester,in the year 1275, and Henricus Housson in the poll tax register of Yorkshire in 1379. In Germany in the year 1402, one Willi Hugo is recorded as being a burger of Ravensburg, whilst English church recordings include William Hughson, who was christened on October 1606 at St. Giles, Cripplegate, London, and Racque Hugo, a French Huguenot, who was a witness Threadneedle Street French Church, London, on March 6th 1639.

The first known recording of the family name is shown to be that of Rogerus Hugo, which was dated 1185, in the rolls of the Knight Templars of England. This was during the reign of King Henry 11, known as “The Builder of Churches”, 1154 - 1189. 

In the United Kingdom today there are 501 people with the surname Hughson, this places it as the 8836th most common. For every 1million people 11 are called Hughson!

Sources: 

http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Hughson#ixzz1YsxG8zkn

http://www.houseofnames.com/Hughson-family-crest

My 1st Memory

I was 4, and on my way to my grandparents with my mum, we used to walk it seeing as it was only 15 minutes away.  I remember the local shop we walked past used to have several large boulders in front of it (I think it was meant to be artistic), and I thought ‘that looks like something awesome to climb on’, so I leapt on to the first boulder, and amidst shouts from my mum to “GET OFF YOU’LL HURT YOURSELF”, I immediately lunged for the next one…I slipped, and fell head first in to the third boulder.

CRACK….crying….blood….mum screaming!

After that my next memory from the day was lying face up in a hospital, with a curved needle coming straight towards my face.  I needed 4 stitches, and still have the scar in the middle of my forehead 25 years later!

Wordless Wednesday: Some negatives I have (unknown people)

Wordless Wednesday: Some negatives I have (unknown people)

What’s in a surname: Pover

1st occurrence in my family history: 4th Generation (Great Grandmother, Annie Everitt [Pover])

This interesting name has three possible origins, the first is an anglicized variant of the Olde French ‘Pohier’ - a medieval locational word meaning ‘the man from Picardy’. The second is from the Olde French ‘Pouvre’ - a sardonic nickname for a poor man, but probably referring to the opposite! The third is also French ‘Poer’ and means ‘power’ - again a nickname surname, and one found in the Munster Province of Ireland. The many spellings include Poor, Poore, Powers, Poher, Puiher etc. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Walter le Poher. which was dated 1162 The Pipe Rolls of Lincoln. during the reign of King Henry 11 The Builder 1154 - 1189.

First found in Gloucestershire where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the census rolls taken by the ancient Kings of Britain to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.


Sources:

 http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Pover#ixzz1YssqHiAZ

http://www.houseofnames.com/Pover-family-crest

http://www.your-family-history.com/p/pover-family-history.php

Wordless Wednesday

Wordless Wednesday

Wordless Wednesday: GG Grandfather’s Army Regiment

Wordless Wednesday: GG Grandfather’s Army Regiment

Wordless Wednesday: Benjamin Davies, unknown relation to family, assumed family friend

Wordless Wednesday: Benjamin Davies, unknown relation to family, assumed family friend